I'm Kate. I do science. And when I'm not blowing stuff up, I'm trying to become a better photographer, musician, and cat. No really, Ruffles is teaching me to lay in front of the heater all day, beg for belly scratches whenever people are near, and tunnel under the area rug in the hallway. It's a good life.

This blog is a partial repository for my own photography, partial collection of inspiration photos (and a reflection of my love for photojournalism) and partial display of the chemistry nerd at my core. Check out more of my work on Flickr or follow me on Twitter!

 

Patterning the embryo
Yoosik Kim and Stanislav Shvartsman | Princeton University | Chemical and Biological Engineering

These images are vertical cross-sectional images of embryos of Drosophila melanogaster — otherwise known as the common fruit fly. The images, obtained using a confocal microscope, are of embryos stained with antibodies in order to visualize molecules that subdivide the embryo into three tissue types: muscle, nervous system, and skin.
Obtaining such images is an engineering challenge since it requires upright positioning of a tiny embryo, which is ellipsoid in shape and only a half-millimeter long.
In collaboration with Lu lab at Georgia Tech, we have developed a microfluidic device to trap and orient a large number of embryos vertically. This technique can be used to quantify spatial profiles of signaling molecules, which can be used to develop mathematical models and eventually to understand the processes that drive the development of the embryo.

(source)

Patterning the embryo

Yoosik Kim and Stanislav Shvartsman | Princeton University | Chemical and Biological Engineering

These images are vertical cross-sectional images of embryos of Drosophila melanogaster — otherwise known as the common fruit fly. The images, obtained using a confocal microscope, are of embryos stained with antibodies in order to visualize molecules that subdivide the embryo into three tissue types: muscle, nervous system, and skin.

Obtaining such images is an engineering challenge since it requires upright positioning of a tiny embryo, which is ellipsoid in shape and only a half-millimeter long.

In collaboration with Lu lab at Georgia Tech, we have developed a microfluidic device to trap and orient a large number of embryos vertically. This technique can be used to quantify spatial profiles of signaling molecules, which can be used to develop mathematical models and eventually to understand the processes that drive the development of the embryo.

(source)

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